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Hollywood & Levine

Hollywood & Levine looks at the world of entertainment, pop culture, screenwriting, and life, and takes none of it seriously. The point is to make you laugh, although useful information might accidentally slip through. Hosted by Emmy-winning writer/baseball announcer/talk show host, Ken Levine, Hollywood & Levine will feature commentary, war stories on Ken’s career (MASH, Cheers, Frasier, Simpsons), interviews, writing advice, movie reviews, snarky award show recaps, tall tales from his baseball and radio career, segments from old broadcasts, improv sketches, answering listener questions, and more. It’s a fun, fast-paced hour of humor, nonsense, and God knows what.
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Dec 31, 2016

For Ken Levine's first episode, he dives into the world of television, film, and comedy. He kicks off award season with some commentary on the Golden Globes (and why they should not be taken seriously) and explains how award winners are chosen. Ken also has a discussion about special effects, and how a snowball fight on Wings was accomplished. There's a very special cameo by a fella named Mr. Special Effects (played by Ken's partner David Isaacs) who provides insider info on how sitcoms get all the wacky scenes are rigged up. Plus, Ken does his first podcast version of "Friday Questions," a popular feature on his blog.

1 Comments
  • nine and a half months ago
    Brian Phillips
    Wonderful episode from an informed voice. Many podcasts consist of some information and two or more people laughing at each other's witticisms. Levine states adamantly that he wishes to communicate to each listener and that doesn't require a second person, although he promises interviews, which are certainly welcome.

    On his blog, when I offered a partially-informed answer to another commenter, Levine found not only an expert, he found the person that was part of the process in question. It was akin to Woody Allen pulling Marshall McLuhan over to a so-called expert while waiting in a movie line to correct him, albeit in a much nicer fashion. I look forward to hearing from the people that actually worked on the shows I have enjoyed to share their stories.